Monday, 23 March 2015 07:42

Philharmonie de Paris

Oliver Wainwright/Guardian, 2014 Oliver Wainwright/Guardian, 2014

 

This is the next world class innovative building from the pompidou Centre. The Philharmonie de Paris was one of the first buildings to be designed without grid lines, using only BIM. The prestigious building has been hailed by President of France, Francois Hollande as the greatest piece of civic architecture in the French capital for a quarter of a century. The €390 million concert hall, which opened to the public on the 14th January 2015, was designed by the Pritzker-prize winning architect Jean Nouvel, Hon. FAIA. It joins the other museums, conservatoires and theatres clustered in the Parc de la Villete to form the largest music complex in the world—as part of the ongoing redevelopment taking place in the 19th arondissement.

 

The Philharmonie site spans 19,600 sq.m, accommodates 2,400 people and required 3,500 tonnes of steel and 50,000m3 of concrete to construct. The architect’s non-linear, free-flowing design was achieved only through assiduous use of a complex digital modeling software.

PHILHARMONIE DE PARIS

The steel fabrication for this unconvential structure was overseen by Severfield Watson who then subcontracted our specialist engineeers at Structural and Civil Consultants ltd to design the complex nodal points that are critical to the design. Our engineers then used a BIMs software designed by Kennedy Watson. The BIM was based on the analysis packege Hergos (above) and a Tekla model (below), which were together used to collaboratively access the geometry and loads for the design.

PHILHARMONIE DE PARIS 3PHILHARMONIE DE PARIS 2

The project has been lauded for its high-tech design, and the main designers alongside whom SCCL worked (Egis) were recently awarded the prestigious ‘Construction and Development Prize’ by the National Grand Prix for Engineering. A timeline of the projects development is available to review on the Philharmonie de Paris website

Structural & Civil Consultants are regularly used by many of the UK's leading steel fabricators as their specialist designers.